Word of the Day #28: Berserk

Berserk: violently or frenetically destructive; wildly destructive To go berserk is to have a fit of destructive rage.   Berserk came into English from Old Norse.  In Old Norse, a berserkr was a raging warrior.  The Norse word is likely a combination of ber (bear) and...

Word of the Day #25: Capricious

Capricious: impulsive; fickle; whimsical; changeable; erratic  The ancient gods were capricious.  They were happy one moment, and irate the next.    Source: Capricious came to English via the French word capricieux meaning capricious, or whimsical.  In French, a whim...

Word of the Day #24: Sanguine

Sanguine: Hopeful, confident, cheerful; having an optimistic outlook.   Sanguine comes from the Latin word sanguineus, meaning blood red.   Doctors once thought patients with excess blood were more cheerful, hopeful, and confident.   But, sanguine can also mean...

Word of the Day #23: Frenetic

Frenetic: Frenzied, frantic, feverishly excited; excessively agitated After missing his deadline, the author wrote at a frenetic pace in order to have something to show his publisher.  Greek phrenetic, “frenzy, disease of the mind, inflammation of the brain.”...

Word of the Day #22: Jocund

Jocund: Merry and cheerful; jovial; having a cheerful disposition Example: Her jocund personality cheered everyone around her.  Jocund comes from the Latin word jucundus, meaning pleasant, agreeable, or delightful.  Jucundus is related to the Latin word for joke,...

Word of the Day #21: Absquatulate

Absquatulate: to run away, usually with someone or something you shouldn’t be running away with  After robbing the bank, the thieves absquatulated with the money.   Absquatulate looks Latin.  Oddly enough, it was once popular to make up words that looked and sounded...