All posts by Dwane

Tip of the Week #107. Get a job.

Every Saturday, I send out a tip of the week.  I also include announcements, upcoming classes, and so on.  If you want to hear from me every weekend, sign up for my weekly updates here:

This time of year, there is a lot of talk about college.

I am a teacher.  Over the last 20 years, I have spent much of my time talking with students.  Naturally, many of those conversations were about college.

Many people think I am anti-college.  I am not.  I am anti-debt.

The cost of college has risen exponentially.  Considering the product these factories are producing these days, the price of college has become a joke.

Or, worse.  Since debt is a form of slavery, and since we are loading the young with debt, perhaps the cost of college has become more than a joke.  For many, the cost of college has become the introduction to slavery.

To misquote Patrick Henry, “Our children’s chains are forged! Their clanking may be heard on the plains of campuses everywhere!”

Debt is slavery.  Debt is strain.  Debt is stress.

Early on in my marriage, well-meaning, older, “wiser” Christians pressured me into buying a house.  The condo we were living in was “too small”.  I was a teacher in a private school.  Teachers in private schools don’t earn much money.  I couldn’t really afford the house.

(Teachers in government schools do just fine, but I refuse to work for the government.  If you take the king’s dime, you are the king’s man.)

I foolishly left the condo we were living in.  I bought the house.  This dumb decision on my part sent us into a downward financial spiral that lasted years.  Three years later, after trying for almost two years, we sold the house.  We sold it at a loss.  We moved right back into a condo.  Even though it is “too small” we still live in a condo today.

That condo that was “too small”?  It is now worth twice what I paid for it.  Someone else’s profit.

That house debt locked me into a bad employment situation.  I couldn’t get out because I was locked into debt.  I had to pay the bills.  That house and that debt strained our marriage.  We have never fully recovered.  The cracks and fissures and strain are still there today.

I can’t believe that, as a culture, we allow students to walk into the combat zone of debt.  Worse, we encourage them to do it. “So, kid?  Where are you going to college?”  What are we thinking?

It took twenty years and way too much strain, but we are now debt free.

I am thinking of getting a job at a local bike shop when I return to Tennessee.  I do not need the job.  I do not really need the money.  But, I have always loved mountain biking.  I wish I had gotten a job at a bike shop when I was younger.  By, now, I am sure I would own my own store.

Before you go to college, before you go into debt, try hard to identify your passion.  If you can, get a job inside that passion.  Love working out?  Get a job at the gym.  Love biking?  Get a job at the bike shop.  Love eating healthy food?  Get a job at the smoothie place downtown.

In other words, do what humanity used to do before we all started believing in the college fairy tale.  Become an apprentice.   At least for a while.  If your career choice requires college, then go.  Just go later.

And, please.  Read this before you sign that college application: http://files.stansberryradio.com/files/50_colleges_GA1LLNJBSZ.pdf

Have a happy Saturday!
Dwane Thomas

 

More student answers and corrections now available…

May is a busy month for me.  Lots of final grading.

As I grade my way through, I am adding numerous new answer keys based on student responses.

If you are a subscriber, you now have full access to the last 5 or 6 years of my work.  Here it is: https://dwanethomas.com/my-courses-2/

Now available this week for the first time:

First Year Latin by Robert Henle

  • Exercise 216
  • Exercise 286
  • Exercise 408
  • Exercise 435
  • Exercise 465

Second Year Latin by Robert Henle

  • Exercise 4
  • Exercise 8
  • Exercise 14
  • Exercise 20
  • Exercise 22
  • Exercise 24
  • Exercise 26
  • Exercise 34
  • Exercise 37
  • Exercise 38
  • Exercise 44
  • Exercise 49
  • Exercise 52
  • Exercise 58
  • Exercise 76
  • Exercise 80
  • Exercise 86
  • Exercise 88
  • Exercise 89
  • Exercise 91
  • Exercise 96
  • Exercise 101
  • Exercise 118
  • Exercise 129
  • Exercise 140
  • Exercise 155 – Still working on this one.
  • Exercise 160 – Still working on this one.
  • Exercise 170
  • Exercise 178
  • Exercise 182
  • Exercise 190
  • Exercise 197
  • Exercise 209
  • Exercise 215
  • Exercise 223
  • Exercise 226 – Still working on this one.
  • Exercise 228 – Still working on this one.

Lingua Latina by Hans Ørberg

  • Capitulum 1
  • Capitulum 2
  • Capitulum 3
  • Capitulum 4
  • Capitulum 5
  • Capitulum 6
  • Capitulum 7
  • Capitulum 19
  • Capitulum 21
  • Capitulum 22
  • Capitulum 25
  • Capitulum 26
  • Capitulum 27
  • Capitulum 28
  • Capitulum 33

Can I skip Henle 1?

I received this question:

My son has done two years of https://www.livelylatin.com/ online. I know it’s not an intense course, but he’s starting high school next year and I wonder if he would be okay in Henle 2 or if he should start with Henle 1. Do you have a placement test available? Thank you!

Here is my reply:

Unfortunately, I do not have any kind of placement test.  I wish I did.  

I can tell you, though, that the classes I teach online are aggressive.  For this reason, I recommend everyone start at the beginning.  My courses take students from zero to reading the New Testament in Latin in two years.  No other courses that I know of do this.  Almost all of my students are struggling by the third semester.  The classes are just tough.

For this reason, I record everything I teach.  This enables students to slow down and move at their own pace if they need to.  

 You could also use the recordings over the summer in order to prepare for Henle 2 if you wanted.

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War Commentaries of Caesar

You kids today.  I am so jealous.

When I moved to Germany as a teenager, I decided to learn German.  Someone gave me a set of language learning cassette tapes.  This, kids, is a cassette tape:

There were twelve cassettes in the course.  I was glad someone gave the series to me.  As I recall, the series cost about $300.  In the 1980’s, $300 was an inaccessible fortune.

These days, you have access to more German audio material than you could ever listen to.  For free.  Do you see why I am jealous?

Every year, I take students through Caesar’s Commentaries on the Gallic Wars.

I like to listen to audiobooks.  I went hunting for an audio version of Caesar’s book.  I expected to spend $20 to $30 on Audible.com.  I found it.

The Commentaries by Julius Caesar read by Charlton Griffin is my new favorite audio version.  Sure enough, the book costs a bit more than $20.

However, if you want it for free, it is also available on YouTube.  Seriously. Here you go:

You kids today have it all.  You could learn anything.  Stop playing Candy Crush.

Want to join me as we read through Henle 2 and Caesar’s Gallic Wars in Latin?  Click the blue button below: 

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Before you cancel.

Most of my students stay with me for three years.

Students will typically take Latin 1, 2 and 3 before moving on.

At $25 a month, that’s $300 a year.  Remember,  That’s access to every class I teach for $300.  That’s $300 for the entire family.  This is not a per student, per class price.

I have five children.  I am trying to educate them.  I know what it feels like to spend $500 each for each and every online class they take.  I know what it feels like.  It stinks.  I will not do that to you.

I have done the research for you.  Most online Latin providers are going to charge you quite a bit more.  Also, pay close attention to how long the process takes.   (By the way, every other provider raised their prices for the 2017-2018.)

Years to complete

Average Annual Price

2016

2017

Monthly  Price

Think Outside the Border

1 to 2 years

2016: $300

2017: $300

$25

$25

Classical Academic Press

5 years

2016:  $545

2017: $575

$45

$48

Veritas Scholars Online

2 years

2016:  $620

2017: $649

$52

$54

Carmeta Online Latin

5 years

2016: $520

2017: $750

$43

$62.5

Harvard Online Latin

2 years

2016: $950

2017: $1,050

$79

$87.5

Lone Pine Classical

2 – 3 years

2016: $509

2017: $590

$42

$49

Memoria Press

3 – 10 years

2016: $500

2017: $575

$41

$48

Classical Learning Resource Center

3 years

2016: $600

2017: $720

$50

$60

I have not raised my prices this year.  I have been advised to.  I’m not going to do it.

Here’s why.

You don’t need to learn Latin.  Neither do your kids.  You have met hundreds of happy people who didn’t study Latin.  Look around.  You know what I’m saying is true.  You do not have to learn Latin.  Life goes on without it.

I am simply not going to charge more for something you do not need.  In fact, I have been looking for a way to lower my prices.

Instead, I have found a way to reward those who stay with me the longest.  If you stay with me for three uninterrupted years, your payments will end.   It’s my way of saying “Thank you.”

Your subscription will not end.  Only the payments will end.  You and the rest of your kids can keep taking my classes for as long as you like, or for as long as I keep teaching Latin.  I’ve been doing this for 20 years and I see no reason to stop.

However, if you cancel during the summer, as many of my students do, you will have to start a new subscription each fall.

When you cancel, my site will delete your information.  When you come back in the fall, you will have to start a new account, new username, new password, and all of that.

My site, ThinkOutsideTheBorder.com renews membership automatically.  This is designed to make the process easy for students and their families.  You do not have to go through the registration process every year.

If you cancel for the summer, you are going to have to go through the registration process again.  Again, this is because my site is going to delete your information.

It’s up to you.  Cancel for the summer if you like.  It really makes no difference to me.  However, if you decide to just let it run, I am going to reward you in the end.

Yes.  If you let your subscription run through the summer, you are going to be charged $25 a month.  But, remember, that is $300 a year.  And, $300 a year is the most affordable price I have found for online Latin classes.

Wait. That isn’t true.  There is a more affordable option.

I offer lower priced Latin classes.  If you can’t stomach the thought of paying $300 dollars a year for Latin, you could always go with Visual Latin.   Go here and pay $85.

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(By the way, here is the chart I posted in 2016):

Years to complete

Average Annual Price

Monthly  Price

Think Outside the Border

1 to 2

$300/$600

$25/$50

Classical Academic Press

5

$545

$45

Veritas Scholars Online

2

$620

$52

Carmeta Online Latin

5

$520

$43

Harvard Online Latin

2

$950

$79

Lone Pine Classical

2 – 3

$509

$42

Memoria Press

3 – 10

$500

$41

Classical Learning Resource Center

3

$600

$50

Not a member?  Want to join a class?  Just click the blue button below: 

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Vocabulary for Visual Latin 2?

I received this question:

My daughter is enjoying her Latin study with your fun and engaging lessons. We bought the Visual Latin 2 printed course materials. We have not been able to find a place where there is a copy of all the latin vocab from volume 2 (lessons 31-60). Is there a master list for the visual Latin 2 or better yet a visual latin 1 & 2 combined vocabulary list? Thank you for your materials. They are appreciated!

Here is my reply:

Hi!  

Unfortunately, no.  There is a master list for Visual Latin 1, but there is not a master list for Visual Latin 2.  Don’t know how I managed to do that.  That is something I am planning to solve this summer.  

Meanwhile, I recommend these online tools when looking up Latin words:

Whitaker’s Words: http://archives.nd.edu/words.html

The Latin Dictionary: http://latin-dictionary.net/

Another Latin Dictionary (this one is really good for conjugating verbs): http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/verb:vocare

Verbix (a bit complicated and difficult to use, but not bad as a last resort): http://www.verbix.com/languages/latin.shtml

Visual Latin vocabulary organized into lists of flashcards: https://quizlet.com/CompassClassroom/folders/visual-latin/sets

I hope this helps!

Dwane

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Kudos…

Found this note today while grading….

You made her year of Latin so much better than if we had attempted it alone!  Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!

You should know that my daughter received a Gold Summa Cum Laude award this evening for her NLE this year. She missed 3 on the Latin 1 test, and her younger sister by 2 years missed 5 on the Intro. What a surprise to mom!  Thanks for making a difference!

This is our first online class, and I have to say that I am beyond impressed that our teacher who is somewhere out in the Internet world actually knows who we are!  I have always figured that you had so so many students….never would I have dreamed that you would know us the way you do.  Thanks for being personal, even if we never meet face to face!

– Julie

Want to join one of my online classes?  Simply click the blue button below: 

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