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Visual Latin and the Latin Endings

From time to time I get questions about the complicated Latin endings.  Students want to know if there is a place to find them all.  Turns out, there is. If you go here, and scroll down, you will find some Latin charts I made some time ago.  The charts are free.  Here...

Goals: Latin to the Rescue

Last year I wrote a book on goal setting.  I am now in the process of editing that book.  As I edit, I will post excerpts here on my blog.  This is from chapter four: _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Latin...

Word of the Day #117: Oubliette

In a French class this morning, my students and I learned the French word for forget: oublier. We spent a few minutes talking about the word.  Oublier, the French verb, comes from the Latin verb meaning the same thing, obliviscor.  Forgetful, in Latin, is oblitus....

Word of the Day #116: Apanthropy

Raining hard in Tennessee today.  On days like this my apanthropy usually kicks in. Apanthropy is the desire to be alone, a love of solitude.  Apanthropy comes from two Greek words.  The preposition ἀπό (apo) means “away from”.   Ἄνφροπος (anthropos), which you may...

Word of the Day #115: Fiancée

Someone once said, "English is a German language with a Latin vocabulary." We can see the truth of that statement in the word fiancée.  This word came up this morning in a French class I teach. In French, a fiancée is a woman who has promised to marry.  The masculine...

Goals: One Meal a Day

Last year I wrote a book on goal setting.  I am now in the process of editing that book.  As I edit, I will post excerpts here on my blog.  This is from chapter four: _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Why...

Word of the Day #114: Exhaust

Exhaust: to drain; to deplete. This morning, in a Latin class, we came across the Latin verb exhaurire.  Exhaurire is Latin for drawing out, emptying, or draining.  Exhaurire itself is a combination of the preposition ex, meaning 'out of' and haurire, meaning to draw...

Word of the Day #112: Snow

Snow: small, soft, white flakes of ice falling from the sky. This word has been in our language since the beginning.  In Old English, snow was snaw. English is a Germanic language.  Finding similar words in the Germanic languages, then, comes as no surprise. German:...

Word of the Day #111: Santa Claus

Santa Claus: the legendary patron saint of children The name Santa Claus first shows up in American English in 1773.  Before then, Santa Claus was known as Sante Klaas, which itself comes from the old Dutch name for the saint: Sinter Niklaas.  Today, in Holland, he is...