Tag Archives: Henle Latin

Second Year Latin Test 1 is up.

Even though John Gotto wrote this, “Who wouldn’t get bored teaching students who are rude and interested only in grades?” and even though I agree with him, what am I to do?

Incidentally, I don’t deal with very many rude students.  But on a daily basis, I deal with students only interested in grades.  It’s depressing.  I can teach you to read the New Testament in Latin or in Greek  But what of it?  Only one question seems to matter.

“Will I be getting an A?”  Sigh.

Every other day, I receive requests to grade the work of my students.  Nope.  No longer.  (If I am currently grading your work, I will continue to do so.  But, I am taking on no new graded work.)

Remember.  When students send their work to me, they send their work in the ancient Latin or in ancient Greek.  Could you grade that?  It’s harder than you think it is.

If a student sends sloppy careless work, I could spend an hour or two on a single email.   I sometimes receive hundreds of emails a day.  It is no longer physically possible to keep up.  If a half dozen lazy students send sloppy work, I am sunk for a week.  Happens all the time.

On the other hand, It takes me about two hours to create and publish a test.  My site will then grade your work automatically, and (Unless you cancel) track your grades.

Just published a test for Second Year Latin this morning.  Please let me know if you spot any mistakes.

Follow the title.

I received this question:

Perfect – Ok so from reading your Q&A it sounds like keep my Henle kid in Henle 2 – and once she completes that she will have 3 years of Latin?

Here is my reply:

Slowly catching up.  Yes.  As best I can tell, it seems most schools treat Henle 1 as Intro to Latin, Latin 1, and Latin 2. 

Henle 2 is treated as Latin 3. 

It’s confusing. 

I prefer to go with the names of the book.

Latin 1 = First Year Latin by Robert Henle

Latin 2 = Second Year Latin by Robert Henle

Latin 3 = Third Year Latin by Robert Henle

Have a happy Friday!

Help me?

I received a cry for help.  To keep myself on track, I responded to her questions in red.  Her questions are in black font.

Ok so I think I get it. Your classes are live? & recorded.  Correct.  Live and recorded.  Come to class if you can, or watch class later anytime you like.  I feel live offers more dynamics & accountability. So how does that exactly work, we watch live at set time & if I have different kids in different class levels they can jump in on different times?  Yep.  Students can jump in at any level.  If they are joining Lingua Latina though, I highly, highly recommend starting at the beginning.  That book is much tougher than people think it is.  25$ a month for my whole family? Sounds to good to be true.  $25 is correct.  I strive for “too good to be true”.  To see what others are saying, check this page out:  https://dwanethomas.com/testimonials/

I have 8 kids & did cc last yr. Henle killed us. I see you offer Henle plus the other book you recommend for your live T/W classes. Do you assign homework or?  I do assign homework.  I used to check it, but I just do not have the time to do it anymore.  Students and parents are able to check their own work now using the resources I have loaded into my site.  I have also created almost 100 tests and quizzes.  That number is climbing and will continue to climb.  The tests and quizzes provide an immediate grade and immediate feedback.  In the past, students had to wait a long time for me to respond.  I realized that I was the rock in the path.  I am now focusing on creating more resources for parents and students.  I havnt had as chance to look at the Lingua Latina book. But we’re almost to the ‘drop Henle’ point. But if we did the online LL fall class would my child/me easily know what homework he’s to be doing?-sort of like the cc guides spell out for the ch programs? Yes.  I provide syllabi for all of my classes.  These syllabi tell students exactly what steps to take.  I will be updating them with even more detail soon.  Help?  I have been doing this for 20 years, and I see no reason to stop.  You don’t have to learn Latin to live a happy life.  In fact, I recommend learning a modern language before learning Latin.  But, if you have to learn Latin, I can definitely help.

From Henle 1 to Henle 2? Henle 3?

I received this question:

My daughter is going to be enrolling in Classical Conversations for the very first time, going into Challenge 3 where the class will be completing the last part of Henle 2 and then starting Henle 3. I don’t think she is really going to be ready, and I think it might have been better for her to do the second half of Familia with you this year instead. But she didn’t. So, in your opinion, what is the best way for her to get prepared to jump in and not be too over her head? Should she try to do more Familia over the summer? Or would Visual Latin help her to bridge the grammar gap?  

Here is my reply:

I am not sure how to answer this.  In my experience, Henle 1 does not prepare students for Henle 2.  I am teaching Henle 3 this fall.  I am not even sure how to prepare.  So far, as best I can tell, Henle 2 will not prepare students for Henle 3.  

Years ago, I was leaving education for construction and real estate.  I was leaving because of books like Henle Latin.  I discovered  Lingua Latina and decided to stick around a bit longer.  I loved the series then, and I still love it today.  It prepares students for almost anything in Latin.  

It’s a simple numbers game.  First Year Latin by Robert Henle teaches students about 400 words.  Lingua Latina part 1 teaches students about 2,000.  

Have her read Lingua Latina over the summer.  It will prepare her for the Henle books.  It will do a better job than the Henle books.  

By the way, I will likely be offering a Lingua Latina review class over the summer if you are interested.

After Visual Latin?

I received this question:

Dwane…

We have used the Visual Latin for the past 2 years and are sad that it’s ending. My son is going to be in high school and wants to continue his study of Latin… so what would be a good next step for us?

Thanks!

Here is my reply:

Good morning!

If he wants to go beyond Visual Latin, I would recommend one of the next level online Latin classes on my site: www.dwanethomas.com.  I designed these classes precisely for students who wanted to go beyond Visual Latin.

You can find out more here: https://dwanethomas.com/subscribe/

And, here is the schedule for next year: https://dwanethomas.com/schedule/

Dwane

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A common question

I get this question a lot.

“Would you recommend Henle or Lingua Latina for new students? “

Here is my reply:

If you have the time, I recommend everything.  Visual LatinFirst Year Latin by Robert Henle, and Lingua Latina.  The more you study, the more you learn.  Of course, not everyone has the time or energy to do this.

If I had to recommend only one book, it would be Lingua Latina.  Toughest Latin book on the planet, in my opinion.  But, so worth it.  Many students have to read it several times to master it, but, believe me.  It is worth the struggle.

Why Lingua Latina?

Earlier this year, this was posted on my site.  I couldn’t have said it better:

As a recovering Henle student, I also encourage the Lingua Latina book. My sons and I switched over to Lingua Latina after one year of tedious struggle with Henle.

Lingua Latina is not easy. It’s still a struggle and demands a lot of time, but I think it’s the closest thing to learning Latin by submersion without being dropped into a foreign country. (Of course, that isn’t even possible with Latin.)

I speak another language fluently enough that I used to write translations for the UN. I didn’t learn it by first memorizing charts and endings. It’s all about hearing patterns, learning vocabulary in context and then mimicking.  Think of how a child learns to speak. “Jane eat. Mama eat. She eat.”

A child doesn’t begin speaking with correct conjugations. That comes literally years later when the ear tunes into the refinements of the patterns heard. I just wish there were Lingua Latina books for learning every language!